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Leadership styles

 

Six leadership styles that can help create resonance within an organisation and show how successful leaders should be able to switch between styles depending on the situation.

Originators: Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis and Annie Mckee

It is Goleman’s view that an effective leader is one who can create resonance within their team. This means that they are aware and in tune with the feelings of others and can motivate them in a positive direction. People with a high degree of self-awareness and self-motivation are able to create resonance more easily and can resonate with the emotions of those around them.

How to use it?

The book “Primal Leadership” describes six leadership styles that can help create resonance and the most successful leaders should be able to switch between styles depending on the situation.

Visionary – An inspirational leader who motivates people towards a shared vision. They truly believe in the vision and they openly share information and explain how people’s efforts contribute towards it. It has a very strong impact on the climate and is best used when change and a new and clearly defined objective is needed.

Coaching – An encouraging leader who develops people for the future. They connect a person’s wants with organisational goals and help develop people’s career goals by listening to people and helping identify their strengths and weaknesses. It has a highly positive impact on the climate and is best used when helping to improve employees’ performance through building long-term capabilities.

Affiliative – An empathetic leader who creates a harmonious working environment. They boost moral or resolve conflicts through connecting people and focus on the emotional needs of others. It has a positive impact on the climate and is best used to heal rifts in teams or to help people through stressful times.

Democratic – An effective listener who works well with others and values the input of others and gets commitment through their contributions. It has a positive impact on the climate and is useful for getting constructive participation from employees or when trying to build commitment to achieving a shared goal.

Pacesetting – A driven leader who expects excellence and builds exciting and challenging goals for people. They often lead by example and demand the most out of everyone and tend to expect people to know what to do giving little guidance. It often has a negative effect on the climate due to poor execution but it is useful when high quality goals are needed form a very competent and motivated team.

Commanding – A demanding leader who gives clear directions in order to soothe fear. They will give commands expecting full compliance and it is very much a “do as I say” approach which often creates distance. It has a negative effect on climate but is best used in a crisis when un-questioned rapid action is needed or when dealing with problem employees.


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